Last Updated: April 22, 2020, 5:06 pm

COLUMN: Cammie’s Column: Enough with gender stereotypes

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Boys don’t cry and girls belong in the kitchen. Do these accusations infuriate you? Good. That’s how it should be. 

Gender stereotypes have been in our midst for as long as any of us can remember and I, for one, am sick of the blatant hatred and misconception placed on both genders.

According to Planned Parenthood: “Gender roles in society means how we’re expected to act, speak, dress, groom and conduct ourselves based upon our assigned sex. For example, girls and women are generally expected to dress in typically feminine ways and be polite, accommodating and nurturing. Men are generally expected to be strong, aggressive and bold.”

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Because of these stereotypes, there is a weight placed on both men and women to present themselves a certain way and if these guidelines are not met, individuals who try to express their differences are denied any form of social acceptance.

While our current generation is far more accepting than previous ones, there is still a social stigma in place preventing individuals from truly embracing themselves despite their gender.

By forcing these “rules” on everyone, we are teaching people to not only hide a part of themselves, but also to push aside their feelings. I don’t want to be part of a generation that lacks these important traits.

“A stereotype is a widely accepted judgment or bias about a person or group — even though it’s overly simplified and not always accurate,” according to Planned Parenthood. “Stereotypes about gender can cause unequal and unfair treatment because of a person’s gender. This is called sexism.”

“I urge all of you to try your best in helping to break the social stigma; be who you want to be and never be afraid to show it, no matter what others think about your actions.”

Cammie Johnson, DSN Staff Writer

With gender roles still in place, we are teaching impressionable youth that they need to be less of who they are unless it fits with what is expected. If we allow this to continue, there will be more harm done than good.

We should want to encourage people to break the social stigma, not blindly follow decades of old traditions. It should be OK for a man to show his sensitive side and for a woman to be more strong and bold. 

Students and staff at Dixie State University, I urge all of you to try your best in helping to break the social stigma; be who you want to be and never be afraid to show it, no matter what others think about your actions. Gender roles need to be put to rest. What better place to start than right here at DSU?

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