Last Updated: September 28, 2018, 5:56 pm

Starving Student Cards offer savings for everyone

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This food is only a small part of the deals you get with the starving student cards. The starving student cards are a way for students to save money. Photo by Kaitlynn Latham


Starving Student Cards are now in their ninth year of supporting students and local businesses in southern Utah  with great deals, discounts and free items.

For $25 students can save hundreds at local businesses with the annual discount card, thanks to owner David Clay.

Clay grew up in St. George where he attended Snow Canyon High School. He was first introduced to the Starving Student Card when he attended Utah Valley University doing sports marketing as a work study job. After a couple years of studying at UVU, he moved back to St. George and started school at Dixie State University.

“When I realized Dixie and SUU did not have a Starving Student Card I contacted the owners and bought the rights for all of Southern Utah,” said Clay.

In Nov. 2016, Clay and his wife bought all of the Starving Student Card from the original owner and the pair has been directly involved in setting up Utah county and Salt Lake City for the last few years.

“We set the offers up to be a total win-win,” Clay said. “Everyone who buys a card is supporting a student.”

Clay said a lot goes into getting an offer, and that every business deal is a case-by-case scenario.

“Businesses have definitely stepped up and their hope is that people will come in, have a great experience, and come back whether they have a coupon or not,” Clay said.

The DSU campus store is not the only place to get a Starving Student Card; they are available at The Washington Community Center and Coyote Exchange as well. They are also commonly sold for high school sports, choir and band fundraisers. Starving Student Card has also co-branded with The Boy Scouts of America in support of their organization.

The card for 2018-2019 features new locations such as Jack In The Box, Crumbl Cookies, Jamba Juice and Pieology.

Clay was especially thankful with the addition of Jack in the Box for their aggressive offer of a free Jumbo Jack.

“It’s just a great burger,” Clay said. “One of my favorites in town.”

DSU campus store cashier, Heather Scow said the cards are a great seller in the store.

“During rush week we sold probably 30 or 40 cards a day,” Scow said.

Panda Express is one of the many restaurants that are on the card offering a free appetizer as well as a buy two entrees get one free deal.

Stephanie Telles, sophomore psychology major from Manteca, CA, and shift leader at Panda Express said: “I think the card has affected the business in a really positive way because it brings in a lot of college students and they usually come in groups. For someone to come in and get a discount it really helps. It brings a lot of business and it helps the customer.”

Telles said Panda Express also offers students 10% off with their student ID, but it can not be combined with any Starving Student Card deal.

The card not only offers a wide variety of food, drink and dessert deals, but also includes a completely free: car wash, manicure, haircut, tan and more.

Students can use their Starving Student Cards at businesses in St. George, Cedar City, Hurricane, Parowan and Mesquite.

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